Counseling

Therapy is facilitated by a licensed professional with a master’s degree level of education or higher and is registered with the state of Colorado. Our counselors have a vast and diverse skill set to meet your individual needs.

Want to know more about types of therapy we do at Minds in Motion?


Somatic Experiencing (SE):

Somatic Experiencing (SE) can be explored more on the website traumahealing.org. It can be defined as an approach to trauma by helping the body regulate it’s autonomic nervous system. Unresolved trauma can create a dysregulation of our fight/flight or freeze mechanisms, and long term activation of being in fight/flight can cause psychological or physical symptoms. This technique is versatile, effective and works with the mind-body connection.


EMDR:

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is a multi-phased protocol which enables people to heal from emotional distress and other symptoms related to life experiences an individual finds disturbing or traumatic.

EMDR is an evidence-based practice. In over 30 clinically controlled studies, EMDR was shown to effectively reduce or eliminate symptoms related to Posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD) as well as other types of emotional trauma. EMDR uses the organic and naturally occurring neuronal networks within an individual’s brain to reprocess memories to an adaptive conclusion by removing blocks or barriers to healing. Studies show that the brain’s information processing system naturally moves toward mental health. EMDR is effective and efficient in cases where traditional talk therapy alone has not provided desired and optimal outcomes.

While the earliest EMDR treatments used guided eye movement, subsequent studies have demonstrated that bilateral stimulation using audio or tactile stimulation can also be effective. EMDR is endorsed as an effective form of therapeutic trauma treatment by the American Psychiatric Association, the World Health Organization, and the US Department of Defense.

Denise has completed basic and advanced trainings in EMDR. She does a comprehensive assessment to determine if EMDR is an appropriate clinical tool. Clients are provided with education about the protocol as well as ongoing dialogue regarding what to expect during and following EMDR sessions. Clients are taught strategies for creating and utilizing internal resources for self-calming and emotional regulation. Trauma memories are not erased but the emotional “charge” around the trauma is effective neutralized; replaced with an adaptive and often empowering emotional response.


Hypnotherapy:

To understand hypnotherapy, hypnosis must be defined:

Hypnosis is a deepened state of relaxation allowing the body and mind to focus and concentrate. Hypnosis is completely safe.  A person in a hypnotic state has complete control over his/her experience.  People who have experienced hypnosis describe it to be a very pleasant and relaxing experience.

Hypnotherapy uses hypnosis to guide a client in achieving specific goals and outcomes.  Through the deepened state of relaxation clients are able to increase their awareness, sourcing new solutions and possibilities for achieving their goals and changing their behaviors specific to their life situations.   Hypnotherapy has been proven useful for the following:

  • Weight Issues
  • Pain Management
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Habit Change/Addictions
  • Stress Management
  • Anxiety Fears and Phobias
  • Acute Stress Disorder/PTSD
  • Self-Esteem Enhancement
  •  Insomnia
  • Performance Enhancement
  • Motivation/Concentration
  • Improving Relationships
  • Grief
  • Death and Dying Issues
  • General Well-Being
  • Regression Therapy
  • Spiritual Connection/Understanding One’s Purpose

What do I need to know about hypnotherapy?

Q:  What is hypnosis/hypnotherapy?
A:  Hypnosis is an altered state of consciousness established through the use of relaxation, imagery, concentration, expectation and suggestion.  Hypnotherapy uses hypnosis to assist client’s with achieving goals/objectives and outcomes.

Q:  Can anyone undergo hypnosis?
A:  Yes, most anyone can undergo hypnosis if they are willing to participate in the process.  In fact, people enter into an altered state of consciousness several times per day without realizing it.  Examples of this include the waking up state first thing in the morning, the falling asleep state, reading a book, getting engrossed in television and daydreaming.

Q:  What is hypnosis/hypnotherapy used for?

A:  Hypnosis and hypnotherapy can be used for the following but are not limited to:

  • Pain Management
  • Surgery Preparation
  • Addictions
  • Fears and Phobias
  • Stress and Anxiety
  • Acute Stress Disorder/PTSD
  • Birthing
  • Dentistry
  • Athletic Performance/Performance Enhancement
  • Insomnia
  • Motivation and Concentration
  • Enhancing Self-Esteem
  • Improving Relationships
  • Depression
  • Grief, Death and Dying Issues
  • Spiritual Connections
  • Regression Therapy


Q:  I have seen people undergo hypnosis on television and do silly things.  Do people loose control over their own minds and behaviors while under hypnosis?

A:  No.  Although hypnosis is an altered state of consciousness, people still have full control to make choices and participate in the process or stop the process.

Q:  Is hypnosis safe?
A:  There are no documented cases of harm from the use of hypnosis.  Furthermore, there are no documented cases of a person being unable to emerge from a hypnotic state.

Q:  I know someone who has been under hypnosis and he/she claimed they went to sleep.  How does hypnosis work if it only puts you to sleep?
A:  Hypnosis is an altered state of consciousness between being awake and being asleep.  In this state, the subconscious mind can be accessed to facilitate the desired outcome(s).  It is not uncommon to achieve very deep levels of hypnosis whereby the client does not recall the experience and therefore thinks he/she has fallen asleep.  Nonetheless, the subconscious mind has received all of the information and benefited from the hypnotic experience during the hypnotherapy session.

Q:  How long is a hypnotherapy session?
A:  The length of each session depends upon the client and the objectives.  Typically a session can range from 45 minutes to 90 minutes.  This does not include the intake time prior to the hypnosis session beginning.

Q:  How many hypnotherapy sessions are needed?

A:  The number of sessions is determined by the need’s of the client.


Mindfulness counseling:

Mindfulness counseling is a gentle and tool based approach for counseling. Mindfulness is the concept of being present in your moment, without judgment, with kindness. This is easy in definition and difficult in practice. Counseling this way teaches clients how to use mindfulness to ease anxiety, depression, grief or trauma. In session, clients learn how to be more present in their bodies, through sensation and have a different relationship with their thinking. If you do mindfulness psychotherapy, you will learn tools of meditation, neuroscience, breathing techniques, calming techniques and over how to better control your body. Here are some more in-depth descriptions of how mindfulness counseling and meditation can help:

Thinking patterns: therapy will have you look at the varying types of thoughts and beliefs that you have and learn how to address them. Most of your thoughts come from your perception of life’s events, so it’s important for you to vulnerably look at your thought patterns and beliefs during this process. This is why meditation is not easy, and does not always feel good. You will be truly faced with the beliefs about yourself that you may have been hiding, suppressing, or numbing yourself to for a long time. You will spend a significant amount of time noticing your judgment and learning to create a non-judging mind. Once you feel a little more control over your judging mind, you will work on creating new thinking patterns. New thinking patterns and ways of seeing life are addressed through contemplative practices. You will learn how to use contemplative practices in a way that creates re-wiring of the brain to help battle self-criticism, low self-worth, or low self-esteem patterns.

Control: You need better control over and awareness of your thoughts, and to learn how to be more present in your life. If you have more control over your thoughts, you have more control over your actions. Meditation and mindfulness gives you the ability through a changed brain to be less reactive and more responsive in your thoughts and actions.Through all of this exposure to mindfulness and meditation, you will be learning what science tells us about how meditation can increase our sense of control in the brain.

Sensations: When you are actively in thought, you are missing out on the sensory world. You have a complete untapped world of sensation that is missed because you are so active in your thinking patterns. Vision, smell, taste, sound, touch, body awareness, relationship awareness, and connection to environment are all sensations that increase your sense of well-being, connection, and non-judgment and overall peace and contentment in life.

Meditation: Here you will not only learn to meditate in the basic mindfulness-meditation style, but you will also learn ways to make it easier and more accessible. You, as well as most all of us, need to work on ways that make meditation a little more approachable for you when you feel like it’s crazy busy up in the powerhouse that lives in your head. Meditation needs to be consistent, practical, and potent. For these reasons, you will need help with implementing it, even when it feels impossible to attend to your breath for even just a second.

Meditation sometimes can feel like “brain boot camp” – because it is difficult or, at times, impossible to work on establishing control in your thinking world. Meditation and mindfulness are not easy to learn, and take consistency and dedication. What you get in return is a brain that is less reactive, more aware of what you are thinking, and more aware of how you are getting triggered. You will therefore experience more calm and peace in your daily life. Even 20 minutes a day of meditation can create changes that follow you for the rest of your day.

Let’s break this down a little. I view mindfulness as the umbrella over many other practices. Here are the basic definitions:

Mindfulness – To kindly attend to your present moment, whatever it is, without judgment.
Meditation – To concentrate and focus upon an object, sound, visualization, breath, or movement in order to increase awareness of the present moment. The symbolic “clearing out the messy room in your brain.”
Mindfulness Meditation – A type of meditation in which distracting/incoming thoughts and feelings are not ignored but rather acknowledged and observed without judgment so as to create detachment from them and gain insight and control.
Being Present – To be aware of your moment.
Contemplation-Based Practices – Practices that you think about and try to “feel” in your body to help re-wire the negative bias of your brain. If meditation is the “clearing out the messiness,” then contemplative practices are the symbolic “making the room in your brain a nicer place to live.”
Body and Sensory Awareness – To non-judgingly address the sensations around you and in you to create a “here and now” experience rather than having your brain try to associate with something of the past.
Neuroscience – The science of studying the brain and mind connection. We use neuroscience to explain how powerful mindfulness is and how it physically alters and changes the brain.

“Our results suggest that meditation can produce experience-based structural alterations in the brain. We also found evidence that meditation may slow down the aging-related atrophy of certain areas of the brain” – Sara Lazar, Harvard

Basic Meditation Practice:
Sit comfortably with your posture erect but not rigid. You may close your eyes or keep them open and focus on an object directly in front of you. Turn your attention inward to your breath. Notice the sensation of your breath, the feel of the air coming into your nose, feeling it at the tip of your nose, a little cooler and dryer. Notice the air moving down your throat, and also the sensation of your chest or stomach moving in and out or up and down. You can pay attention to all the sensations of your breathing, or you can focus on just one part. Try to notice when your attention drifts away from this focus and you get distracted. Notice the distraction, let it go, then shift your attention back to the sensation of your breath. The point of meditation is to notice your distractions and let them go, rather than to not have distractions and have a quiet mind. Do not try to have any other type of mind than the one you are having right now. Do not force thoughts out of your head or try to be thought-less; this will not work and will only frustrate you. Think of meditation as working a spotlight. The spotlight is where you are paying attention at any given moment. For meditation, the spotlight is lighting up the experience of breathing. You can’t block out or ignore other sensations and distractions around you, but you aren’t putting the spotlight of attention on them. When your spotlight of attention drifts off to a thought, gently shift the spotlight back to your breathing, letting that thought go. Try to keep your attention on your breath as long as you can until your meditation ends.


Copyright by Minds in Motion 2018. All rights reserved.